Blue Butterfly Pea Flower Coffee

Blue Butterfly Pea Flower Coffee

Blue is the new black!

Not as hyped as Dalgona Coffee last year, but another coffee trend is making its way into social media – Blue Butterfly Pea Flower Coffee. An espresso with blue, frothed milk. Fortunately, this coffee trend doesn’t require a Smurf to die or any chemistry lab to be robbed. The coffee is made from 100% natural ingredients and is even healthy.

How does the blue color get into the milk?

The color comes from a blue flower! In Asia, the blue tea of the Blue Butterfly Pea Flower / Asian Pigeon wing has been known for a long time and is often drunk as a tea not only because of its unusual color, but also because of its health benefits. My Thai masseuse recommended the tea to me when I was breastfeeding, for example. Before I give you a few recipes for the preparation of the hip drink, first something about the positive effects of the blue flowers.

blue-milk

Pea flower effect

The plants are native to Africa and Southeast Asia. The tea is only made from the flowers, which are collected during the early hours of the morning and immediately dried in the sun.

In traditional Ayurvedic medicine, the tea is used for various diseases. It helps against stress, depression and for improving memory. It is said to have anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects, to have a calming and anxiety-relieving effect, as well as to have a dehydrating and antispasmodic effect. In addition, it should strengthen the hair and delay the graying of the hair through the blood circulation in the scalp. The consumption of the tea should also have a positive effect on eyesight and fertility. It is also said to improve cell health and thereby reduce the risk of cancer and delay the formation of wrinkles and skin aging. An all-rounder.

The tea has hardly any taste of its own, only very light earthy, woody notes. It is traditionally served with honey and lemon on ice.

Pea Flower Coffee preparation

Either you first prepare a tea from the blue flowers and use it to color your milk, or you add the blue flowers directly to warm milk and color it before foaming. Personally, I find the first variant perfect for layered iced coffee and the second variant better for hot coffee.

With tea: First boil filtered water and warm up the pot. Then put 1 tsp of flowers in a tea strainer and pour 220 ml of boiling water over them. After 5 min. the tea should be dark blue. In the meantime, you can froth the milk and prepare an espresso. First fill the glass half full with the blue tea. Then pour the foamed milk on top so that the tea and milk mix in a light blue color. Finally, carefully pour in the espresso.

With milk only: Warm up 220 ml of milk (also plant milk if you like) and let a tsp of blue flowers soak in it for 5-10 min until the milk is light blue. Let the milk cool down again. Then prepare the coffee like a latte macchiato: froth the milk, pour it into a glass and then carefully pour the espresso so that it sits between the more liquid part of the milk and the foam.

blue-coffee
Variations

As iced coffee: Especially now in summer this is the perfect coffee on ice – a little tip: with crushed ice you can layer the coffee in a glass. To do this, first fill the glass with crushed ice, then pour in sweetened espresso, then over an inverted tablespoon pour in cold milk. Finally, carefully pour in the cold blue tea over a tablespoon and decorate with a few flowers. Enjoy in the sun with a straw.

Purple coffee: Don’t feel like blue? How about purple? All you have to do is add a few squirts of lemon to the blue tea and it will turn purple as if by magic ­čśë For all chemistry nerds – yes, that has to do with the pH value. More lemon and the tea will turn pink. In terms of taste, however, it is too sour. Stick to blue and purple and comment on your favorite combination of blue coffee under the post, please.

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